DEREK R. SLAGLE

 

FEATURED GALLERIES:

RENAMING THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE

Prior to the end of the Obama Administration there was an effort to rename the derogatory landscape of America. The photo series documents the first migration at Loess Bluffs, formerly Squaw Creek. The photos aim to document the intersection of natural phenomena and constructed discourse in United States nature reserves. The images provide rare witnesses to a mass geese migration of one million birds.

Stay tuned for the forthcoming book by Et Alia Press.

 

URBANITY, RURALITY

Street photographs documenting the varied interpretations of rurality, and its inverse urbanity, in the American South.

 

PRAIRIE FIRES

The Flint Hills of Kansas are the last great expanse of Tallgrass Prairie in the nation. The preservation of this diminishing landscape is reliant upon human intervention (a seemingly paradoxical notion) in the form of controlled, prescribed burns. The prairie fires destroy invasive woody plants, add nutrients to the soil, and promotes future growth. This photo series documents the individuals that are part of this process and the complicated relationship between man and nature to maintain a hospitable landscape.

 

WE HAVE NEVER BEEN MODERN

An exploration of the claims and results of modernity in the Southern United States

 

ONLY DAD ON THE PLAYGROUND

Street photographs documenting public isolation; growth and parenthood; and impact of role-reversal as a stay-at-home dad.

Derived from physically being the only dad on the playground in our affluent MidWest suburb and as commentary on the role reversal of being a stay-at-home-dad. Modern fatherhood is still rooted in traditional connotations of what it means to be a dad, a provider, and the roles expected. This photo-documentation of the daily trips to the playground took place over the course of a year and started as a way to deal with the social exclusion. The project revealed not only what modern fatherhood looks like but, also, that my loneliness was often mirrored with my daughter and her interactions.